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  • Drilling Automation and Downhole Monitoring with Physics-based Models

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 05/12/2020 at 9:30 AM (EDT)

    Presented by Dr. John Hedengren

    The drilling industry faces challenging market conditions that motivate the use of automation to reduce costs and decrease well manufacturing variability. The objective of this presentation is to motivate automation initiatives that utilize physics-based models for predictive monitoring and control. This presentation explores current progress, challenges, and opportunities to control critical drilling conditions such as downhole pressure in Managed Pressure Drilling (MPD). The 3 essential elements of automation are explored with a perspective on recent advancements in automation due to downhole measurement availability through wired drillpipe. However, only a small fraction of drilling systems currently utilize wired drillpipe. In automated rig systems, there is additional potential to unlock the predictive capabilities of physics-based models to "see" into the near future to optimize and coordinate control actions.

    A convergence of several key technologies creates an opportunity to use sophisticated mathematical models within automation. A significant challenge is the size of the physics- based models that have too many adjustable parameters or are too slow in simulation to extract actionable information. This presentation shows how fit-for-purpose models can be used directly in the automation solutions. These fit-for-purpose models have unlocked new ways to think about automation in drilling. For example, rate optimization and pressure control have traditionally been separate applications in MPD. Simulation studies suggest significant potential improvement when combining the two applications.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. John Hedengren and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. John Hedengren.

    Dr. John Hedengren

    Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, Brigham Young University

    Dr. Hedengren received a PhD degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. Previously, he developed the APMonitor Optimization Suite and worked with ExxonMobil on Advanced Process Control. His primary research focuses on accelerating automation technology in drilling. Other research interests include fiber optic monitoring, Intelli-fields, reservoir optimization, and unmanned aerial systems.  In addition to drilling automation, he is a leader of the Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (C-UAS), applying UAV automation and optimization technology to energy infrastructure.

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  • Rapid Innovation Case Study – Concept to Commercialization of a New Rotary Steerable System in Less than Two Years

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 04/16/2020 at 9:30 AM (EDT)

    This webinar is about how to rapidly develop new technology.

    This webinar is about how to rapidly develop new technology. It will describe how a new-generation Rotary Steerable System (RSS) was developed from a blank sheet of paper to first commercial work in just 23 months. It will focus on the importance of developing a clear and simple requirements specification to provide the “True North” direction to keep the project focused and on track and offer simple tools to develop and test such a requirements document. It will discuss how risk was removed from the project, and how a “fail fast” philosophy and adherence to a strict cadence in testing allowed the system to be delivered so quickly. As background to some of the design decisions, the webinar will briefly review how the RSS market has changed over the last two decades, and how, as a direct result of these changes, the design team focused on modular design and rapid turn around of tools, in order to maximize utilization and efficiency. Although the case history is specific to a particular type of tool, the principles used are broadly applicable and should be of interest to anybody practicing innovation  and new product development.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by John Clegg and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from John Clegg.

    John Clegg

    Weatherford Fellow

    Mr. Clegg is a Weatherford Fellow in the drilling domain. Over 33 years he has worked in multiple countries in engineering, manufacturing, sales and operations with upstream technologies including drill bits, drilling motors, rotary steerable tools, measurement-while-drilling, logging-while-drilling and managed pressure drilling. He holds a Master’s degree in Engineering Science from Oxford University, England and is a Chartered Engineer and Fellow of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers in the UK. He has 14 patents, has authored multiple papers and sits on the Boards of the Drilling Systems Automation and Research and Development Technical Sections of SPE, the Program Committee for the IADC/SPE Drilling Conference and the SPE Drilling Advisory Committee.

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  • Practical and Value-driven Management of Non-Technical Risks

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 04/02/2020 at 9:30 AM (EDT)

    Presented by Christiaan Luca

    Non-technical or external stakeholder risks have become a dominant factor in the upstream business. Especially capital projects may experience significant schedule delays or cost overruns due a variety of issues of governmental, social, environmental, security or other external nature. Delegating your response to External Affairs or hiding behind a Corporate Social Responsibility program is no longer good enough.

    Adequate addressing of non-technical risks, both mitigating downsides and benefiting from upsides, can be done, but needs an advanced level of internal organization and a culture that accepts external stakeholder perspectives. Technical functions need to take an active role and responsibility in addressing non-technical risks and need to work closely together with commercial and externally facing functions.

    Christiaan Luca will give you practical tips on how to organize internally for effective addressing of non-technical risks and how to minimize undesired surprises from external stakeholders. The important role of management and the technical functions will be a key element of this lecture. A solid external response requires a solid internal organization.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Christiaan Luca and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Christiaan Luca.

    Christiaan Luca

    Independent Trainer, Assessor and Coach

    Mr. Luca graduated with a BSc in mining engineering and a MSc in petroleum engineering, both from Delft University, the Netherlands. The first 14 years of his 32-year career with Shell he spent overseas in a variety of petroleum engineering roles, including drilling, reservoir engineering, project planning and economics developing oil and gas fields in Thailand, Syria, Gabon and Nigeria.

    Upon returning to Shells corporate offices in the Netherlands, he held various management roles in technology and business strategy and planning. In these positions he was closely involved with externally challenged programs in CCS and Rigs-to-Reefs. Until end 2016, Christiaan was the head of Shells global practice in non-technical risk management. He now is an independent trainer, assessor and coach in this expertise area.

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  • Challenges in Realizing the Full Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Oil and Gas Industry

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/17/2020 at 9:30 AM (EDT)

    ​Additive Manufacturing, commonly known as 3D Printing, is a new manufacturing technique where material is added and a part is “printed” layer by layer. This makes additive manufacturing a method of choice for highly complex customized components. Additive Manufacturing has seen considerable growth in the Oil and Gas industry in last few years. Apart from being able to solve challenges faced by Oil and Gas Industry through complex designs, the biggest value added of additive manufacturing is the ability to manufacture obsolete parts at a reasonable cost and within a short time, as there is a lot of very old equipment still in operation.

    Additive Manufacturing, commonly known as 3D Printing, is a new manufacturing technique where material is added and a part is “printed” layer by layer. This makes additive manufacturing a method of choice for highly complex customized components. Additive Manufacturing has seen considerable growth in the Oil and Gas industry in last few years. Apart from being able to solve challenges faced by Oil and Gas Industry through complex designs, the biggest value added of additive manufacturing is the ability to manufacture obsolete parts at a reasonable cost and within a short time, as there is a lot of very old equipment still in operation. 

    The utopian goal of manufacturing parts cheaply and efficiently at or near the point of use is still quite a long way away. Some of the problems that need to be solved include: lack of machine robustness, long qualification times, post processing time and resources required, technical and legal issues with reverse engineering, lack of International Standards, inability to change the metal powders quickly in a machine, and design for additive. Some of these problems are in the domain of the Oil and Gas companies, whereas there are some that are beyond them.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. Naeem Minhas and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. Naeem Minhas.

    Dr. Naeem Minhas

    Advanced Materials and Additive Manufacturing Technologist

    Dr. Minhas is a Technologist focusing on Advanced Materials and Additive Manufacturing. Naeem has a Master’s Degree in Aerospace Materials and a PhD. in Advanced Structural Ceramics from Imperial College London. He did his Post Doc from KAUST, followed by a position in the Imaging and Characterization department at Core Labs as a Research Scientist. He also has a Masters in International Development from London School of Economics. 

    He Joined Baker Hughes at the end of 2014 as a research engineer based in Dhahran Technology Center. In his current role, he leads the Future of Design & Manufacturing Center focused on metal 3D Printing based in Dhahran. He is also a member of the Industry Advisory Board of University of East London.

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  • Groundwater Protection Council’s Produced Water Report: Regulations, Current Practices, and Research Needs

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/05/2020 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    The Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) developed a report that examines current regulations, practices, and the research needed to expand the use of produced water, a byproduct of oil and gas production, as a resource. Led by its member states, the GWPC brought together a collaboration of scientists, regulatory officials, members of academia, the oil and gas industry, and environmental groups to explore roles produced water might play in developing greater water certainty.

    The Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) developed a report that examines current regulations, practices, and the research needed to expand the use of produced water, a byproduct of oil and gas production, as a resource.

    Led by its member states, the GWPC brought together a collaboration of scientists, regulatory officials, members of academia, the oil and gas industry, and environmental groups to explore roles produced water might play in developing greater water certainty. The report consists of three focused modules which include: 

    • Module 1: Current Legal, Regulatory & Operational Frameworks 
    • Module 2: Produced Water Reuse in Unconventional Oil & Gas Operations
    • Module 3: Produced Water Reuse & Research Needs Outside Oil & Gas Operations

    The report notes freshwater stress is driven by rising populations, regional droughts, declining groundwater levels and several other factors. When surface water is scarce, communities and industries typically turn to groundwater to meet their freshwater needs. Produced water could become a resource that could reduce the use of freshwater for some of these needs in specific locations.  

    One of the concerns of the GWPC is the overuse of fresh groundwater resources and one of the aims of the report is to explore how produced water might help fill that gap. By identifying opportunities and challenges of using produced water and offering options for addressing them, the GWPC hopes to facilitate the development of produced water as a supplement to freshwater resources and fulfill its mission to promote the protection and conservation of groundwater for all beneficial uses.”

    Most oil and natural gas produced water is reinjected deep underground into producing oil and gas reservoirs to enhance production or into porous rocks for disposal. Presently, the reuse of produced water accounts for approximately less than 1 percent of water produced although reuse appears to be increasing in some areas. The report identifies challenges currently limiting the reuse of produced water and provides a framework for the evaluation of reuse options, focusing primarily on research needs. In an effort to facilitate more research, the report also provides a literature review, based on search logic developed by the workgroup. This review catalogs nearly 550 published papers on produced water in one place.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Ed Steele and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Ed Steele.

    Ed Steele

    Principal, Ambiunt Environmental and Regulatory Consulting

    Mr. Steele began his career as a hydrogeologist for the State of Pennsylvania. Following this, he spent a number of years as an environmental and geotechnical consultant and as the environmental manager for an international chemical manufacturing company. He spent 20 years with major international oil and gas companies. During this time, he had overall responsibility for providing strategic direction, building and overseeing the implementation of environmental programs as well as providing technical advice on water management and water treatment technology. Ed then acted as Environment, Geosciences and Water Technology Manager for GE Global Research and then transitioned into a role as Principal Technical Advisor for BHGE following a merger. Ed is currently the principal for Ambiunt Environmental and Regulatory Consulting. Ed has acted as a technical advisor to a number of university programs including the Advanced Water Technology Center at the Colorado School of Mines, the Center for Multiphase Transport Phenomena at Michigan State University, the Global Petroleum Research Institute at Texas A&M University and the Stanford Center for Induced and Triggered Seismicity. Ed has authored, edited and contributed to a number of professional publications and has had extensive international experience encompassing 36 countries and has worked on projects in 38 US states.

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  • Global Climate Change Wars and Fossil Energy; Current and Future Realities

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/05/2020 at 9:30 AM (EST)

    Presented by Dr. George Stosur

    Global climate change remains top of the agenda for lively discussion on TV documentaries, frightening newspaper headlines, science magazines and foreign policy journals. 

    The sudden abundance of relatively clean and inexpensive shale oil and gas is profoundly changing global energy markets. Despite the rapid growth of renewable energy, the fact remains that fossil fuels will continue to dominate world energy consumption for decades to come. Therefore, fossil fuel consumption will continue to produce greenhouse gas emissions that are linked to global warming. Public and political pressure, however, is to curtail the use of oil and gas hydrocarbons or find solution for permanent disposal of heat trapping gases. This is no longer an option for the future; it is a political necessity. 

    Carbon dioxide sequestration and storage presents a huge challenge for research and development. Massive projects will eventually be required, leading to many opportunities, new businesses and specialized services. Most of these activities will fall on the shoulders of petroleum engineers and geologists.

    This presentation provides a view on global climate change issues, starting with causes and effects, the positions of believers and skeptics and the often contradictory arguments of scientists and policy makers, with the likely political consequences for the petroleum industry.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. George Stosur and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. George Stosur.

    Dr. George Stosur

    Speaker

    Dr. Stosur managed oil and gas R&D programs at the U.S. Department of Energy in Washington, D.C. for 22 years. He was responsible for DOE-sponsored research at universities, National Laboratories and joint R&D projects with several countries. Other experience includes Chevron and Shell Oil R&D in EOR, heavy oil, and the first trial of using nuclear explosive to fracture ultra-low permeability formations. He served as an SPE Section Director, SPE Distinguished Lecturer and guest speaker for several cruise lines. Authored 86 papers and contributed to a five-volume encyclopedia on hydrocarbons. He holds two M.S. degrees and a Ph.D. in petroleum engineering.

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  • Loss Circulation – Toolbox for a Scenario Based Systematic Approach to Reduce NPT (Non-Productive Time)

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 02/20/2020 at 9:30 AM (EST)

    This presentation will serve to highlight the various engineering, chemical and data-based tool at the industry’s disposal in what is referred to as the “loss circulation tool-box”. It will also highlight workflows that are based on a systematic approach to increase the likelihood of success of the solutions and hence have a positive impact on reducing Non-Productive Time.

    Loss circulation is one of the key contributors to Non-Productive Time (NPT) in drilling, completion and the cementing phase of a well. While the challenge is the same, the underlying causes are different based on the conditions of each of aforementioned operations. This therefore requires a holistic approach – for existing solutions such as Managed Pressure Drilling, Casing & Liner Drilling to be synergistically used with fluid design and contingency planning – to execute a successful overall operation. Various technologies should be evaluated as complimentary solutions and not mutually exclusive. This presentation will serve to highlight the various engineering, chemical and data-based tool at the industry’s disposal in what is referred to as the “loss circulation tool-box”. The presentation will also highlight workflows that are based on a systematic approach to increase the likelihood of success of the solutions and hence have a positive impact on reducing Non-Productive Time.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Ahmed Amer and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Ahmed Amer.

    Ahmed Amer

    Wellbore Services Technology Manager, Newpark

    Mr. Amer, PMP, is Newpark's Wellbore Services Technology Manager, supporting lost circulation technology. He has worked in operations, technical services and R&D in domains including fluids and pressure control equipment including deepwater. Ahmed is member of API Subcommittee 13, AADE Fluids Conference technical committee, and is the Vice Chairman for AADE Fluids Management Group. At industry events, he has participated as a judge, steering committee member, session chair, reviewer, panelist and presenter. Ahmed acts as an industry advisor to two post-graduate university programs; holds IP; has authored 20+ publications and delivered deepwater and lost circulation classes to SPE.

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  • Stop, Drop and Circulate, An Engineered Approach to Coiled Tubing Intervention in Horizontal Wells

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 02/06/2020 at 9:30 AM (EST)

    Presented by Charles Pope

    In North America, the average cost of a coiled tubing intervention is $250,000. Experience shows that 30% of the wells will have cost overruns of more than $500,000. Additionally, 1 well in 16 has a stuck pipe event and consequently, the costs escalates to an average of $1.7 million per well.

    This talk will share how and where coiled tubing is used around the world. Historical practices are reviewed and the issues associated with them.

    Also, the need for engineering involvement to improve the coiled tubing intervention will be . This includes a road map for expected drag, detailed time modeling, fluid system planning and data capture. Planned short trips have been eliminated.  Low viscosity fluids are used to provide superior hole cleaning. When overpull is observed, operators should stop pulling out of the hole, drop down, and circulate until the debris is removed.  

    This engineered solution has been performed on over 75 coiled tubing interventions. These procedural improvements reduced time on location by 50%, reduced cost by 50% and prevented any stuck pipe.

    One take away: old, historical practices are not your friend in preventing stuck pipe. The solution: stop, drop and circulate.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Charles Pope and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Charles Pope.

    Charles Pope

    Founder, Complete Shale

    Mr. Pope is the founder of Complete Shale, an international consulting firm specializing in drilling and completing horizontal wells. Charles has spent more than 35 years working in the oilfield. He completed the first horizontal well in the Austin Chalk in the late 1980’s. Charles serves on the SPE ATCE Well Completions Committee and SPE Workshop: Application of Integrated Diagnostics for Unconventional Resource Development Committee.  He has authored multiple technical papers. While working at Devon, he was the Completions Technology Supervisor, where he led a team focused on optimizing coiled tubing interventions. He has held various positions with Sun, XTO Energy and Pinnacle Technology. Charles formed Complete Shale 2008. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Oklahoma. Charles will serve as a SPE Distinguished Lecturer for 2018-2019.

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  • The National Petroleum Council Roadmap to At-Scale Deployment of Carbon Capture, Use, and Storage in the United States

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 01/29/2020 at 11:30 AM (EST)

    The United States leads the world in CCUS deployment today with approximately 80% of the world’s carbon dioxide (CO2) capture capacity, with many of the early projects driven by market economics, including the availability of low-cost supply of CO2 and demand for CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Moreover, although the United States is currently the world leader, its 25 million tonnes of CCUS capacity represents less than 1% of the CO2 emissions from stationary sources.

    The United States leads the world in CCUS deployment today with approximately 80% of the world’s carbon dioxide (CO2) capture capacity, with many of the early projects driven by market economics, including the availability of low-cost supply of CO2 and demand for CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Moreover, although the United States is currently the world leader, its 25 million tonnes of CCUS capacity represents less than 1% of the CO2 emissions from stationary sources. 

    As the US explores options to promote economic growth and ensure energy security while protecting the environment by reducing carbon dioxide emissions over time; the U.S. Secretary of Energy requested the National Petroleum Council (NPC) to undertake and deliver a comprehensive study that would define potential pathways for deploying and integrating CCUS technologies at scale, into the energy and industrial marketplace in the United States, with an emphasis on the petroleum industry.  

    The United States has more than 6,500 large stationary sources emitting approximately 2.6 billion tonnes of CO2 per year across multiple industries. Many of these sources are located near geologic formations suitable for CO2 storage, providing opportunities to expand deployment of CCUS and extend the U.S. leadership position. 

    Large-scale CCUS technologies require significant investments and infrastructure, as well as the cooperation of multiple industries.  The oil and natural gas industry has unique capabilities to contribute to CCUS at the scale required, including the handling of large volumes of gas and liquids, deploying world-scale equipment, evaluating the subsurface for safe storage capacity, monitoring the integrity of storage, constructing pipeline infrastructure, and managing the construction and operation of large capital-intensive projects. 

    Accordingly, the report addresses the entire CCUS supply chain from capture through use and/or storage.  It understands that the success of CCUS at scale requires economic and operational integration across industries, harmonized local/state/federal regulations, and broad public acceptance.  The report addresses the technology advances and choices needed; infrastructure requirements, economics, cross-sector integration, regulation, policy options, and public acceptance.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Nigel Jenvey and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Nigel Jenvey.

    Nigel Jenvey

    Industry Leader, Carbon Management and Carbon Capture

    Nigel has over 24 years of global oil and gas industry experience in technology, exploration, development and production operations with major oil and gas operating companies. He is an industry leader in Carbon Management and expert in Carbon Capture, Use and Storage (CCUS) having previously held roles such as the chair of the CO2 Capture Project, chair of the North American CCS Association, and program chair of the Society of Petroleum Engineers CCUS Technical Section.

    For the National Petroleum Council CCUS Study he was alternate chair for the Coordinating Subcommittee, lead for the Roadmap to Deployment Team and co-author of the Supply Chain and Economics chapter.   At Gaffney, Cline & Associates, Nigel leads the global Carbon Management practice to help customers understand the wide variety of options available that will ensure continued business success through the energy transition.

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  • Hydraulic Unit Determination and Permeability Prediction Based on Flow Zone Indicator Using Cluster Analysis

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 01/23/2020 at 9:30 AM (EST)

    ​The aim of this webinar is to highlight that a hydraulic unit’s zonation process requires a supervised learning approach instead of a Classical discrimination approach based on subjective geological observations or empirical relationships between permeability porosity data.

    The aim of this webinar is to highlight that a hydraulic unit’s zonation process requires a supervised learning approach instead of a Classical discrimination approach based on subjective geological observations or empirical relationships between permeability porosity data. It will be based on the paper SPE-169307. Flow zone indicator incorporates geological attributes of texture and mineralogy to discriminate distinctive hydraulic units. MULTI- RESOLUTION GRAPH-BASED CLUSTERING (MGRC) is a very powerful non-parametric algorithm which allows to define the optimal number of hydraulic units. The methodology was applied to a Venezuelan sandstone reservoir. Compared to previously used methods it yielded to increase accuracy permeability prediction and identifying different rock types. The methodology integrated all geological information available (core descriptions, image log, lithofacies, XRD, thin section and SEM information). Results obtained were verified using a numerical simulation model.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by César Aguilar and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from César Aguilar.

    César Aguilar

    Senior Petrophysicist, PDVSA

    Mr. Aguilar is a Senior Petrophysicist with PDVSA since 2005. His interests include reservoir characterization, cluster analysis, special logs interpretation and data mining. Cesar holds a specialization in Petroleum studies from IFP. He is a SPE and SPWLA member. He has 9 technical publications presented at 3 international congress and numerous articles in digital magazines.

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