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  • QRI Expert Hour -- Using a Data-Driven Technology to Improve Drilling Efficiency

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/21/2018

    Content for this webinar is provided by QRI. By registering, your contact information will be shared with the sponsor.

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    Experts show how a data-driven technology was applied to hundreds of wells in a major oil field, quickly processing and aggregating large data sets, identifying drilling bottlenecks, and improving drilling efficiency. 

    Dr. Hamed Darabi

    Technology Execution Leader, QRI

    Dr. Darabi is the technology execution leader at Quantum Reservoir Impact (QRI).  Since 2013, Dr. Darabi served as the team lead for multiple field studies, and was involved in the development of various proprietary products at QRI. He also worked on several giant fields in Middle East to implement QRI technologies and perform reservoir studies. Prior to QRI, Dr. Darabi worked as reservoir engineer at Occidental Oil & Gas Corporation and various companies in Middle East, since 2006. His experience spans reservoirs in California, Kuwait, Partitioned Zone, Iran, UAE, Mexico, and Iraq.

    Dr. Ali Karimi

    Drilling and Completion Analyst, QRI

    Dr. Karimi is a drilling and completion analyst at Quantum Reservoir Impact (QRI). He also worked at University of Texas at Austin as a research scientist in 2013 where he worked on drilling and completion research projects related to multi-phase gas influx modeling, drilling automation, thermal fluid design and modeling, managed pressure drilling modeling, and wellbore strengthening. These projects were sponsored by major operators and service companies including ConocoPhillips, Shell, Baker Hughes, Schlumberger, NOV, Saudi Aramco, etc., as part of Rig Automation and Performance Improvement in Drilling (RAPID) consortium. He has (co)authored more than 30 technical papers, holds 5 patents, and serves as an associate editor in Journal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering (JNSGE).

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    Content for this webinar is provided by QRI. By registering, your contact information will be shared with the sponsor.

  • Advanced Imaging and Characterization of Shale rocks – Critical Role in Unconventional Development

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/20/2018

    Increased activity in unconventional (shale) reservoirs has prompted advances in electron microscope imaging and it has resulted in formulation of protocols for shale reservoir characterization. We will discuss characterization workflows and illustrate results.

    In conventional exploration, shales are important as sealing lithologies and as source rocks. As such, their strength and geochemical properties have been the object of much study. In unconventional exploration, the shale formation acts as source, seal, and reservoir so that we examine shales by focusing on their reservoir properties. In particular, total organic carbon (TOC) and porosity (storage capacity) are important reservoir quality indicators. With that in mind, characterization of the organic matter in these rocks is of prime importance.   

    Characterization workflows start with the imaging of the core using a host of imaging modalities. These include, but are not limited to the following: whole-core (single- and dual-energy) helical computed tomography; micro-CT scans (of 1-in. core plugs obtained from the whole core, selected on the basis of whole-core CT, and ties to well log data); standard sedimentary petrography for characterization of sedimentary structures; organic petrology (reflected and fluorescent light imaging); Raman spectroscopy;  high-resolution, two-dimensional scanning electron microscopy of polished (argon ion milled) samples; three-dimensional scanning electron imaging (using image reconstruction); and transmission electron imaging of organic matter to gain a detailed understanding of the organic matter with respect to storage capacity and morphology. TEM analysis follows the earlier nondestructive techniques/analyses used to characterize the organic matter. Imaging studies are run in parallel with shale rock properties (SRP) measurements made on both intact and crushed material. Imaging and image analysis tied to the physical property measurements allow for the development of predictive rock properties models. 

    Increased activity in unconventional (shale) reservoirs has prompted advances in electron microscope imaging and it has resulted in formulation of protocols for shale reservoir characterization. We will discuss characterization workflows and illustrate results.

    Kultaransingh (Bobby) Hooghan

    Speaker

    Bobby has a Master’s degree in Physics from Mumbai University and one in Engineering Technology from University of North Texas.  He has been doing SEM imaging work since college focusing on FIB/SEM since 1995.  He taught courses in FIB at Microelectronic conferences from 1990 to 2012 and has extensive experience in imaging, including Cryo and Environmental Imaging.  He has contributed to FIB related handbooks and been awarded three (3) US patents for Microelectronic.  For seven years, Bobby worked exclusively on geologic application for Weatherford Labs, where he primarily carried out electron imaging of shales and organic matter characterization using a multitude of techniques and modalities. He has authored several publications in this field and earned one US and one Australian patent for Oil & Gas applications.   

    Lori Hathon

    Assistant Professor of Petroleum Engineering, University of Houston.

    Dr. Hathon received a Bachelor of Science degree, with Honors, from Michigan State University, and a PhD in Sedimentary Petrology from the University of Missouri.  After finishing her education, she spent six years in Exploration and Production with Amoco Production Company, and 20 years in fundamental rock properties research at Shell International E&P, Inc.  Her areas of research include forward modeling of clastic reservoir properties (diagenesis, porosity, permeability), imaging and image analysis linked to rock properties measurements (digital rocks),  and modeling of geomechanical properties (compressibility and strength).  The last several years of her tenure at Shell were devoted to understanding organic matter catagenesis and porosity evolution in shale reservoirs.  

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Best Practices to Reduce Venting and Flaring with Economic Benefit

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/20/2018

    The presentation discusses the drivers for reducing venting and flaring and gives a step by step approach to address EPA Compliance Alert from project identification to ultimate success in sending gas to a gathering or sales pipeline. The characteristics of storage tank vent gas are discussed.

    Existing and evolving regulatory requirements require oil and gas producers to reduce venting and flaring of natural gas from their operations. Regulatory agencies tightening venting and flaring emissions include Environment Canada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA), U.S. Department of the interior, state/province environmental and oil and gas mining regulatory agencies. These rules seek to minimize the loss of natural resources and to reduce air pollution emissions. The air pollutants of concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide. The source of the natural gas is primarily flash gas liberated from the storage of crude oil and condensate. The presentation discusses the drivers for reducing venting and flaring and gives a step by step approach to address  EPA Compliance Alert from project identification to ultimate success in sending gas to a gathering or sales pipeline. The characteristics of storage tank vent gas are discussed. Steps include identifying project scope and emission standards, design data needs, best design practices, installation, commissioning and monitoring systems. The use of smart systems to measure and monitor system operation and the amount of gas recovered is included. Also covered is the design and use of vapor recovery towers (VRTs) to reduce the chance of oxygen entering the vapor recovery systems.  Supplemental emission controls using vapor combustion units as backups to the vapor recovery system is also addressed. The presentation will also introduce new technologies used to automate the detection and reporting of leaks from open thief hatches used on storage tanks, No Heat Acoustic Crude Stabilization and Gas Measurement.

    Jeffrey Voorhis

    Speaker

    Mr. Voorhis obtained the degree of Bachelor of Science in Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering from Kingsville Texas A & M University in 1983. In January 2012, Mr. Voorhis joined HY-BON ENGINEERING and has been using his oil and gas permit expertise to overcome regulatory barriers  Mr. Voorhis is a registered professional engineer in the State of Texas and has 22 years of private sector engineering experience in the on shore/off shore petroleum industry. He has also served 22 years’ work for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, (TCEQ) and Texas Railroad Commission (RRC) where he provided engineering and technical assistance on pollution prevention in the United States and Mexico. In these diverse functions, he has successfully provided technology to many pollution prevention and environmentally conscious projects, resulting in over 250 million dollars a year in savings.. He has many publications including preparation of Texas Pollution Prevention Assessment Manual and Case Studies of Source Reduction and Waste Minimization by Texas Industries. He has served on FOSTTA and many EPA committees. He is also was project leader for TSCA, PPIS, RCRA, Galveston Bay, and NICE3 grants. Mr. Voorhis is also a Registrar Accreditation Board Environmental Management Systems Lead Auditor for ISO 14000. He was the first certified EMS Lead Auditor in state service. Mr. Voorhis was named was TCEQ employee of the Year in Pollution Prevention in 2005.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Module 3: SEC Guidance for Reserves Reporting

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/16/2018

    The SEC staff issued guidance in 2009 and in 2013, and we will explain the guidance in this module.

    The SEC has issued guidance intended to clarify reserves definitions and reporting requirements in documents it calls "Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations," or C&DI. The SEC staff issued guidance in 2009 and in 2013, and we will explain the guidance in this module.

    To purchase this course as part of the series, go to: SEC Reserves Reporting Regulations Series.

    Dr. W. John Lee

    Von Gonten Chair in Petroleum Engineering, Texas A&M University

    Dr. Lee holds BS, MS and PhD degrees in chemical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Early in his career, John worked for ExxonMobil and specialized in integrated reservoir studies. He later joined the Petroleum Engineering faculty at Texas A&M, and became Regents Professor of Petroleum Engineering. While at A&M, he also served as a consultant with S.A. Holditch & Associates, where he specialized in reservoir engineering aspects of unconventional gas resources. Professor Lee joined the University of Houston faculty in September 2011 and held the Cullen Distinguished University Chair until September 2015, when he rejoined the Texas A&M Faculty. He served as an Academic Engineering Fellow with the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) in Washington during 2007-2008, and was a principal architect of the modernized SEC rules for reporting oil and gas reserves. John and his team received the SEC’s Law and Policy Award in 2009. Professor Lee is the author/co-author of four textbooks published by SPE and has received numerous awards from SPE, including the Lucas Medal, the DeGolyer Distinguished Service Medal and Honorary Membership. He has received Distinguished Achievement and Honorary Life Member Awards from SPEE and is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Implementation of State of the Art Coiled Tubing Technologies in Challenging Completions

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/13/2018

    Two industry experts will provide insights on new coiled tubing technology applications focused on driving innovation and incremental well performance. This will be a combined webinar presentation that will focus on cost effective abrasive jetting technologies and real time assessment of stimulation fluid diversion by employing coiled tubing fiber optics.

    Click here for a sneak peek of the webinar.

    Two industry experts will provide insights on new coiled tubing technology applications focused on driving innovation and incremental well performance. This will be a combined webinar presentation that will focus on cost effective abrasive jetting technologies and real time assessment of stimulation fluid diversion by employing coiled tubing fiber optics.

    “Abrasive Jetting Applications throughout the Life of a Well-From Drilling to Plug and Abandonment” 

    The use of abrasives mixed in a fluid under pressure has been used in the oilfield for over 50 years.  Abrasive jetting was rediscovered as a perforating method on coiled tubing in the late 1990’s and has demonstrated distinct advantages over traditional explosive perforating.  Today’s abrasive jetting technologies seek to find ways to combine the superior performance and safety into increasingly cost efficient methods to save operators time and money. Applications for abrasive jetting can be found from drilling to production to plug and abandonment, making it extremely versatile. 

    This presentation educates the participant about new applications for abrasive jetting technology throughout the life cycle of the well. Abrasive jetting is no longer just a means for perforating casing - it can be used to help free stuck pipe in drilling; reduce coiled tubing runs for completing new wells; recomplete and stimulate producing wells; evaluate cement bond during plug and abandonment activities; and more.  Technical improvements are also discussed that improve effectiveness of the technology and are demonstrated in case histories. We will also look at what the future holds for this technology and where the next benefits can be found.

    “Overcoming Challenges of Stimulating a Deepwater, Frac Pack Completed Well in the Gulf of Mexico Using Coiled Tubing with Real-Time Downhole Measurements”

    Achieving effective fluid coverage of stimulation operations in deep water frac-pack completions is often  challenging due to a variety of factors, including but not limited to the length of screened intervals, the uncertainty of damage mechanisms, and the ability of diversion materials/fluids to divert beyond the screens and into the formation. This case study demonstrates a successful technique used in conditions not previously attempted.  

    This particular well had two deep high pressure commingled zones.  Previous operations had indicated the presence of a fish or obstruction near the lower portion of the bottom zone.  Several previous attempts to stimulate the well had failed.  This was one of the deepest uses of fiber optic cable ever attempted, and the tools used needed to be tested and rated for operations outside their rated operating envelope.  

    This treatment with fiber optic equipped CT and a rotating, hydraulic high-pressure jetting tool was able to achieve a successful stimulation of a 500 ft long frac packed zone after several previous failures using different techniques.  A 75% increase in production was achieved by using a CT equipped with fiber optics and downhole measurement tools. Engineers were able to perform a data-driven operation based on real-time bottomhole measurements and distributed temperature surveys.

    Thomas Dotson

    President, TD Tools, Inc.

    Mr. Dotson is the President of TD Tools, Inc.  He is a design engineer and inventor with twenty years of experience in pumping services, tool design, research and development, and consulting. He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Western Kentucky University in Physics. Thomas holds eight U.S. patents, has published three papers on sand jet perforating and cutting with the SPE. He founded TD Tools, Inc. in 2007.

    Eric Gagen

    Petroleum Engineer, Schlumberger

    Mr. Gagen has 20 years of experience in the oilfield and a Bachelor’s Degree in Petroleum Engineering from Berkeley.  He has served in a variety of technical and engineering management functions.  With Coil Tubing Services he was involved in organizing and expanding one of the largest independent coiled tubing companies in North America prior to their purchase by Smith.  His primary expertise is in reliably melding developing technologies with existing operations.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • First-Ever Environmental Characterization of Hydraulic Fracturing for Shale Oil and Gas Production

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/08/2018

    Presented by Daniel Tormey

    The well completion process of high volume hydraulic fracturing has become a touchstone for opposition to the development of oil and gas resources from shale source rocks. Although the development of shale gas and oil has brought substantial economic, geopolitical, and climate change benefits to the United States, hydraulic fracturing has displaced global climate change as the most controversial environmental policy issue. As other countries evaluate development of shale oil and gas, these same environmental concerns are available on the internet and media sources. Without data, the concerns become a substantial hindrance to acceptance of shale gas development.

    This study presents the first-ever peer-reviewed study that quantifies the effects of two specific high-volume hydraulic fracturing jobs to 14 different environmental resource categories. The objective was to provide factual information supported by a high-quality dataset to guide policy making. None of the measurements detected a change due to hydraulic fracturing, including microseismic effects, ground motion and induced seismicity, water quality, methane migration, community health, well integrity, fracture containment to the target zone, and others.  

    The hydraulic fracturing occurred in the center of Los Angeles, California, at the largest urban oil field in the US. The level of community and regional concern, the breadth of the study, and many of the results are applicable to other shale oil and gas areas worldwide. The results provide the first dataset that addresses the range of concerns directly, and finds no adverse effects to any of the environmental resource categories. The results have subsequently been used at state and national levels in the United States to further the understanding of these issues.

    Dr. Daniel Tormey

    Energy, Water, and Land Management Expert

    Dr. Tormey is an expert in energy, water, and land management, and he conducts environmental reviews for both government and industry. He works with the environmental aspects of all types of energy development, with an emphasis on oil and gas, including hydraulic fracturing and produced water management, pipelines, LNG terminals, refineries and retail facilities. He has a Ph.D. in Geology and Geochemistry from MIT, and a B.S. in Civil Engineering and Geology from Stanford. He is President of Catalyst Environmental Solutions.  He was named by the National Academy of Sciences to the Science Advisory Board for Giant Sequoia National Monument; is a Distinguished Lecturer for the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE); is a member of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Geoscientist Specialist Group; is on the review committee on behalf of IUCN for the UNESCO World Heritage Site List; is volcanologist for Cruz del Sur, an emergency response and contingency planning organization in Chile; was an Executive in Residence at California Polytechnic University San Luis Obispo; is a Professional Geologist in California; and is a Fellow of The Explorers Club. He has worked throughout the USA, Australia, Indonesia, Italy, Chile, Argentina, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, Brazil, Senegal, South Africa, Armenia and the Republic of Georgia.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Module 2: SEC Reserves Reporting Requirements

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/08/2018

    This module will summarize major SEC reporting requirements.

    As part of its reserves modernization effort in 2008, the SEC issued new requirements for reporting reserves in filings with the Commission. These reserves reporting requirements have no parallel in either PRMS or in pre-2008 SEC regulations. This module will summarize major SEC reporting requirements.

    To purchase this course as part of the series, go to: SEC Reserves Reporting Regulations Series.

    Dr. W. John Lee

    Von Gonten Chair in Petroleum Engineering, Texas A&M University

    Dr. Lee holds BS, MS and PhD degrees in chemical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Early in his career, John worked for ExxonMobil and specialized in integrated reservoir studies. He later joined the Petroleum Engineering faculty at Texas A&M, and became Regents Professor of Petroleum Engineering. While at A&M, he also served as a consultant with S.A. Holditch & Associates, where he specialized in reservoir engineering aspects of unconventional gas resources. Professor Lee joined the University of Houston faculty in September 2011 and held the Cullen Distinguished University Chair until September 2015, when he rejoined the Texas A&M Faculty. He served as an Academic Engineering Fellow with the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) in Washington during 2007-2008, and was a principal architect of the modernized SEC rules for reporting oil and gas reserves. John and his team received the SEC’s Law and Policy Award in 2009. Professor Lee is the author/co-author of four textbooks published by SPE and has received numerous awards from SPE, including the Lucas Medal, the DeGolyer Distinguished Service Medal and Honorary Membership. He has received Distinguished Achievement and Honorary Life Member Awards from SPEE and is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Mechanical Integrity Lessons Learned from API Process Safety Site Assessments: Driving Operational Excellence

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/08/2018

    The API Process Safety Site Assessment Program was developed in 2011.This presentation will provide an overview of the program and present some of the mechanical integrity learnings, trends and benchmarking data developed from the assessments based on the five-year history of the program.

    The API Process Safety Site Assessment Program was developed in 2011 as part of the AFPM and API Advancing Process Safety Programs.  PSSAP began conducting assessments in 2012. By the end of 2017, the API Site Assessment program will have conducted 59 General (7 protocols) and 34 HF Alkylation/RP 751 assessments. These assessments have been conducted 63 different refineries and petrochemical facilities. The areas assessed are: Process Safety Leadership, Management of Change, Mechanical Integrity, Safe Work Practices, Operating Practices, Facility Siting, Process Hazards Analysis, and HF Alkylation/RP 751. Mechanical integrity typically scores 10 percentage points lower than the other areas. This presentation will provide an overview of the program and present some of the mechanical integrity learnings, trends and benchmarking data developed from the assessments based on the five-year history of the program.

    Chad Patschke

    CPSA

    Mr. Patschke has more than 20 years of experience in maintenance; mechanical integrity (MI); process safety management (PSM); and various engineering assignments involving operations, maintenance, process safety, and project management. He has held the positions of plant manager, operations manager, production superintendent, engineering manager, and materials engineer.

    He has both domestic and international experience in a variety of industries that have processes involving highly hazardous chemicals, including refining, oil and gas production (both onshore and offshore), petrochemical, LNG, specialty chemical, pharmaceutical, fertilizer, consumer products, ammonia refrigeration, and hazardous waste treatment operations. He has taught numerous training courses on mechanical integrity and understanding RAGAGEPs, and has written numerous articles on related topics.

    Currently Mr. Patschke assists clients with all aspects of MI as well as PSM program development, implementation, and auditing to satisfy U.S. OSHA’s PSM regulation, U.S. EPA’s RMP rule, U.S. BSEE’s SEMS rule, internal company standards, and good industry practices. He also leads and participates on teams investigating MI-related incidents and provides expert witness services to clients.

    Mr. Patschke is an active member of the API Committee on Refinery Equipment and the Subcommittee on Inspection. He is a Certified Process Safety Auditor (CPSA) and was selected to participate on the joint API/AFPM Process Safety Site Assessment team for conducting site assessments and API RP 751, Safe Operation of HF alkylation unit audits at multiple refineries throughout the U.S. Mr. Patschke previously held inspector certifications for API 510 Pressure Vessels, API 653 Atmospheric Storage Tanks, and API 570 Process Piping, and he has developed and managed MI programs for a variety of companies.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Risk not Chance, STEM Student Risk Awareness

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    These videos help the end user recognize we encounter risk every day, and we mitigate this risk by introducing barriers.​

    The goal of the Risk Not Chance project is to increase risk awareness, and improve the understanding of risk and choice for STEM students. This project aims to increase the understanding of how risk plays a role in our everyday lives, how it can be misunderstood and how we use it to make decisions. These videos help the end user recognize we encounter risk every day, and we mitigate this risk by introducing barriers.

    Thank you to the United Engineering Foundation for supporting the creation of these videos. Without their support, these videos would have never been possible. Please visit https://www.uefoundation.org/ for more information about this project and others.

  • Risk not Chance, First Responders Risk Awareness

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    These videos help the end user recognize we encounter risk every day, and we mitigate this risk by introducing barriers.

    First responders have a unique role and perspective when dealing with safety at industrial sites. While this video is largely aimed at first responders, it’s a great way for chemical engineers to understand their role and perspective when dealing with industrial facilities. Understand what they require and why, and learn how their emergency response plan prioritizes to manage risk for them, the surrounding community, and those at the facility. 

    This video is part of the Risk Not Chance project, which was designed to increase risk awareness, and improve the understanding of risk and choice for first responders. The project aims to increase the understanding of how risk plays a role in our everyday lives, how it can be misunderstood and how we use it to make decisions. These videos help the end user recognize we encounter risk every day, and we mitigate this risk by introducing barriers.

    Thank you to the United Engineering Foundation for supporting the creation of these videos. Without their support, these videos would have never been possible. Please visit https://www.uefoundation.org/ for more information about this project and others.